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title:“Theophilus Parson's Notes of the Massachusetts Ratification Convention”
authors:Anonymous
date written:1788-1-24

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http://consource.org/document/theophilus-parsons-notes-of-the-massachusetts-ratification-convention-1788-1-24-2/20130122081308/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 8:13 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Nov. 25, 2017, 5:50 a.m. UTC

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"Theophilus Parson's Notes of the Massachusetts Ratification Convention." The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution. Vol. 6. Ed. Gaspare J. Saladino and John P. Kaminski. Madison: Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 2000. 1340-43. Print.

Theophilus Parson's Notes of the Massachusetts Ratification Convention (January 24, 1788)

3 O'CLOCK, P M.
Eighth section.
Mr. DENCH. These powers will dissolve the State governments.
Mr. CABOT answered Mr Dench.
Mr. DENCH replied.
Gen. BROOKS, of Medford, answers Mr Dench at large, byshowing the Federal government cannot exist, but on the existence of the several governments.
Maj. HOMER wishes to have explained the Federal town.
Mr. STRONG explains it. Congress must have exclusive legislation where they sit, to prevent or punish insults.
Dr. TAYLOR. The district is too largemaycontain barracks and stores.
Mr. KING. Words, in their nature and language, are imperfect. The Convention must either enumerate the rights of the general government, or the rights of the State governments—most for the liberties of the States to enumerate the powers of the general government, and all not enumerated still remain to the States-rights of all, therefore, accurately defined, which he illustrates by direct taxes—the power of 3 O'CLOCK, P M.
Eighth section.
Mr. DENCH. These powers will dissolve the State governments.
Mr. CABOT answered Mr Dench.
Mr. DENCH replied.
Gen. BROOKS, of Medford, answers Mr Dench at large, byshowing the Federal government cannot exist, but on the existence of the several governments.
Maj. HOMER wishes to have explained the Federal town.
Mr. STRONG explains it. Congress must have exclusive legislation where they sit, to prevent or punish insults.
Dr. TAYLOR. The district is too largemaycontain barracks and stores.
Mr. KING. Words, in their nature and language, are imperfect. The Convention must either enumerate the rights of the general government, or the rights of the State governments—most for the liberties of the States to enumerate the powers of the general government, and all not enumerated still remain to the States-rights of all, therefore, accurately defined, which he illustrates by direct taxes—the power of availing itself of the whole resources, is essential—there is no government without it, except Turkey Under the new government, the wants of each government will be confined, but the wants of the general government must be unconfined—people suppose they can increase the general government without lessening the State's power—'tis not true. Our State now is not a sovereign State—we cannot make peace, or war or treaties—no aristocracy in the new government.
Dr. WILLARD has the thirteenth article of the Confederation read, and the tenth article of the sixth section [chapter] of ours was read, andobserved that we ought to be jealous when our Constitution is in danger.
Mr. KING says, the people at all times have the control of their Constitution.
Dr. WILLARD. Our governments are governments of laws and not of men, and the Constitution cannot be altered but according to the compact.
Mr. JONES, of Boston. The word consolidation has different ideas, as different metals melted into one mass, two twigs tied into one bundle.
Mr. DENCH insists upon it, by consolidation under the Federal government, will dissolve the powers of the States, and render our elections insecure.
Rev. Mr. WEST answered it.
Gen. THOMPSON. Unconstitutional to adopt it—if we do, it will be of no force—our delegates did not keep within the line of their duty.
Mr GORHAM. The delegates kept within their line—the powers authorized the reporting the Federal Constitution. Some articles of our bill of rights read. Mr. SEDGWICK. The only question is, what is for the general good and happiness of the people.
Mr. STRONG, (who did not sign,) says, the concurrence of three to sign not necessary—a majority makes a quorum, viz., three; and a majority of the quorum gives the vote of the State through sickness he was obliged to return home, but had he been there he should have signed it—then shows that the delegates acted within their line—under the words provisions and alterations, this new Constitution may be reported—but we have nothing to do with it—our business is solely to adopt or reject the Constitution.
Dr. WILLARD charges King with treating some of the members illiberally as insinuating that some of them listened to out-of-doors whispers.
Mr. KING denies the charge—he only said that if any people did listen to such whispers, they did wrong. Mr. DALTON observes that Mr. Singletary introduced out-of-door talk, and gave a just foundation for Mr. King's observations.
Gen. BROOKS, of Lincoln. The rights of the general government are distinct from the particular governments, because all rights not given to the general government remain to the States—the word guaranty does not imply a gift or grant, but a warrant and defence.
Mr. WEDGERY. Our Constitutions are not our defence why should Congress guarantee a republican form—they may notwithstanding, unite us into one republican form—every body knows that Congress have no power but what is given them—the question is, what is given them.
Hon. Mr ADAMS. To guarantee is not to—
Mr. PARSONS, on the guarantee.
Mr. DAWES.
Adjourned.

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