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Source & Citation Info

title:“Elbridge Gerry to Ann Gerry”
authors:Elbridge Gerry
date written:1787-8-29

permanent link
to this version:
http://consource.org/document/elbridge-gerry-to-ann-gerry-1787-8-29/20130122075730/
last updated:Jan. 22, 2013, 7:57 a.m. UTC
retrieved:Aug. 17, 2018, 1:28 p.m. UTC

transcription
citation:
Gerry, Elbridge. "Letter to Ann Gerry." Supplement to Max Farrand's The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. Ed. James H. Hutson. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987. 247. Print.
manuscript
source:
Autograph Letter Signed, Sang Collection, Southern Illinois University

Elbridge Gerry to Ann Gerry (August 29, 1787)

Wednesday 29th. Did the same as yesterday. ELBRIDGE GERRY TO ANN GERRY Wednesday Aug. 29 What is the Cause my Dearest Love that you are of late so liable to fainting? I am quite distressed about it. If you do not find relief soon, I shall quit the convention, and let their proceedings take their chance. Indeed I have been a Spectator for some time; for I am very different in political prin- ciples from my colleagues. I am very well but sick of being here; indeed I ardently long to meet my dear nancy. I think we shall not be here longer than a fortnight, and if it was possible I would leave this place immediately. I wrote three or four letters last week, and this is the fourth this Week, including one that accompanies the Stays. I am very sure I did not send a letter without franking it, and think the cover must have been taken off. There are a set of beings here capable of any kind of villainy to answer their purposes and I think they need not open this letter, to know my opinion of them: but if that measure is necessary, they have my permission. I think they have intercepted some before, and that a person who is a notorious turn-coat knows the contents. If he should open this he will know who I mean, by his interrogating me whether I had heard from a particular friend. I will seal with my Cypher in future. Adieu my dearest Girl, let me hear that you are happy and I may bid defiance to any injuries from politics. Kiss our little darling, give my regards to all Friends and be assured I am your most affectionate E. Gerry If you conclud to take the silk or as much of it as is wanted I will not look farther.

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